Learn How to Use Interrogative Pronouns With the Help of Examples

Interrogative Pronoun Vs. Interrogative Adjective “Wh” words can also be used as interrogative adjectives. A quick tip to distinguish between the two – an interrogative adjective will always modify the noun or pronoun, unlike an interrogative pronoun, which always replaces the noun. Interrogative pronouns are the pronouns used to ask questions. They are used to…

Research Paper Outline Format: An Easy-to-follow Tutorial

Writing a good research paper involves specific steps like choosing an appropriate research paper topic, skillfully constructing the thesis statement (a proposal which conveys the message that you are going to explain certain facts or observations). Writing a thesis involves finding and collecting information to strengthen your arguments, supporting and defending the hypothesis, making a…

Books Bound in Human Flesh Offer a Unique Glimpse Into History

Several of the most famous libraries in the United States, including libraries at Harvard and Brown University have books in their collection with unique covers, tanned and polished to golden brown. The covers may look like fine leather, but they are made from human skin. The practice of binding books in human skin wasn’t uncommon…

Easy Ways to Sell Used Books

Summer is the time to clean up your home. And once you start, you realize that there are so many unwanted and long forgotten things stored in your attic. One of them is old used books…old school textbooks, children’s story books, old encyclopedias, management books, recipe books. The list can really be endless. Some of…

Learn About Cumulative Sentences With Proper Examples Right Here

Cumulative Sentence Vs. Periodic Sentence Cumulative sentences work well for explaining theories, as the main idea is given first, and additional information is given to build up on the idea. Periodic sentences keep the reader in suspense by beginning with the additional details and providing the central idea at the end. A loose or cumulative…

A Comprehensive List of Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Remember! Make sure that you avoid illogical comparisons while using the comparative and superlative degrees. For example, the words ‘deader’ and ‘deadest’, although listed as real words in some dictionaries, are illogical. One cannot be deader than someone, or deadest of all. A few more examples of such comparisons are alone, always, correct, everlasting, fatal,…